Book Sale: Value of Values – Swami Dayananda

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I’m getting ready to move yet again and I have a massive book collection I’m tired of carting around.  It’s time to lighten the load so I’m getting rid of some great books I’ve already read.  

Next up is “Value of Values” by Swami Dayananda.  With his usual wit and clarity, Swami Dayananda explains 20 values from Chapter 13 of the Bhagavad that are key to enlightenment.   This book is in Like New condition with completely clean pages and no marks on the spine or cover. 

This book is available on Amazon  for 33 to 115 dollars.  You can buy it from me on Ebay for 24.99, where other sellers are listing it for between 62 and 200 dollars. 

Currently, I’m not shipping outside of the U.S. because of the shipping costs.  But if you’re willing to pay extra, Contact Me directly and we’ll work out the details. 

Steady Wisdom: 12 Week Progress Check

Steady Wisdom: 108 Verses On Changing My Thinking

DAY 84 

Arjuna said, “What is the description of the person with steady wisdom, whose mind abides in the self?”
Krishna said, “When, like a turtle that withdraws its limbs, this person is able to completely withdraw the sense organs from their objects, his knowledge is steady.”
-Bhagavad Gita 2:54 & 58
Meditation

When a person is able to withdraw their sense organs from objects, they are said to have steady wisdom.  There is no objection here.  But because I am not a person, nor do I admit the reality of the senses and their objects, how can I, the non-dual self, have steady wisdom?  As the one, unchanging reality, steadiness is my nature, not something I gain from a particular state of mind.  OM.      

Read Series Introduction

Steady Wisdom: Week 10 Progress Check

Steady Wisdom: 108 Verses On Changing My Thinking

DAY 70

Arjuna said, “What is the description of the person with steady wisdom, whose mind abides in the self?”
Krishna said, “The one who is unattached in all situations, who neither rejoices on gaining the pleasant nor hates the unpleasant, his knowledge is well established.”
-Bhagavad Gita 2:54 & 57
Meditation

I am the self, one without a second.  Nothing other than me exists so there is nothing for me to be attached to.  The mind (and all of its states) are falsely superimposed on to me so when the mind rejoices I do not rejoice; when the mind hates, I do not hate; when the mind becomes established in knowledge, I do not become established in knowledge.

Ironically, a mind with steady wisdom negates the possibility that I myself have steady wisdom.  Why? Because it shows that I am reality itself, free of the mind, free of all qualities and distinctions.  OM.

Read Series Introduction

Steady Wisdom: 8 Week Progress Check

Steady Wisdom: 108 Verses On Changing My Thinking

DAY 56-Week 8 Progress Check

Arjuna said, “What is the description of the person with steady wisdom, whose mind abides in the self?”
Krishna said, “The one who is not affected by adversities, who is without yearning for pleasures, and is free from longing, fear and anger, is said to be a wise person whose knowledge stays unshaken.” 
-Bhagavad Gita 2:54 & 56
Meditation

I am the self.  I am not affected by adversity.  I do not yearn for pleasure.  I am free from longing, fear and anger.  But freedom from adversity, yearning for pleasure, longing, fear and anger is not a state I attain—it is my very nature.  When my mind conforms to this knowledge, it is said to have steady wisdom.  But I, the self, am free from wisdom, steady or otherwise.  OM. 

Read Series Introduction  

Purusha & Prakriti according to Vedanta

Q:  What is the relationship between purusha and prakriti in Vedanta? 

Vishnu: In Vedanta (specifically Advaita Vedanta), purusha is used as a synonym for atman, one’s true nature. The atman, in turn, is equated with brahman, the true nature of everyone and everything in the entire universe (both seen and unseen). Since atman and brahman are ultimately identical in Vedanta, purusha is brahman.

Prakriti is more or less the equivalent of maya in Vedanta. Maya is viewed a few different ways, depending on which school of Advaita Vedanta you’re asking. Most often, maya is conceived as a power inherent to brahman that makes the impossible possible: it makes the non-dual, formless and attributeless brahman appear to be the universe and all of its inhabitants.

What is their relationship? Well, technically, since Advaita Vedanta says that brahman is one alone, the only reality that exists, then there is nothing for brahman to have a relationship with (since a relationship implies at least two things).

However, when it’s admitted that our everyday experience patently contradicts Vedanta’s claim that brahman is one alone, an explanation needs to be given. That explanation is maya. In this case, maya is not a second thing over and above brahman. Instead, it is a false, seeming or illusory reality that depends on brahman to exist.

A common example given by Advaita Vedanta to illustrate this “relationship” between brahman and maya is that of the relationship between clay and a pot. When you really think about it, a pot doesn’t actually exist. How so? Because when you try to determine what a pot actually is, all you find is clay. Yes, you see a pot. This is undeniable. But where is the reality of the pot apart from clay? If a pot is made out of exactly one pound of clay, when the pot is weighed, does it weigh one pound (for the clay) plus a bit of extra weight to account for the addition of the pot? No. It is still precisely one pound of clay, nothing has been added except a form that is arbitrarily labelled a “pot.” Clay then is the only reality. And the pot is but an appearance with no actual substance, no actual reality.

It can’t be said that the pot is totally non-existent because it can be experienced, as plain as day. But it can’t be said that the pot is totally existent either, since it is nothing other than clay (all you’re really experiencing as a pot is in fact clay). In this way, their relationship is that clay is the reality and the pot is an appearance that has no reality apart from the clay.

It also can’t be said that the pot is totally different from the clay, since the pot is nothing but clay. But it can’t be said that the pot is totally non-different from the clay either, since the pot can’t exist without the clay while the clay clearly exists without the pot. In this way, their relationship is an inscrutable, logical conundrum. It is, to use a Vedanta technical term, anirvaciniya, indefinable. Because how can something be neither different nor non-different from something else? And yet, it is that way.

The relationship between the clay and the pot is similar to the relationship between purusha (brahman) and prakriti (maya). Brahman, like the clay, is the reality, whereas maya, like the pot, is only a seeming “reality” that has no existence apart from brahman. Maya, since it is nothing but brahman is not totally different from brahman. And yet, it is not totally non-different from brahman since it can’t exist without brahman, while brahman exists without maya, seeing as brahman is existence itself. Hence, the relationship is indefinable.

But when it is taken into account that brahman alone exists (despite any appearance to the contrary), the question of relationship is ultimately rendered meaningless, for again, what talk can there be of a relationship between purusha (brahman) and prakriti (maya) if purusha alone exists?

As a note, purusha and prakriti, although they appear in Vedanta texts such as the Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, are technical terms more commonly associated with Sankhya, the philosophical system that underlies the practice of Yoga. In that system, unlike Vedanta, purusha and prakriti are considered to be two independently existent realities. Also, in Sankhya, there is supposedly an infinite number of purushas, whereas in Vedanta (as stated above) purusha i.e. brahman is considered to be one alone.